Five Facts about Salvador Plascencia

Salvador Plascencia is reading at the Gage Gallery on Monday, September 29 at 5:00 pm, and we’re very excited, so we’ve compiled a quick fact sheet to help you get to know Mr. Plascencia a little bit better:

Five Facts for your Friday about Salvador Plascencia

1. Guadalajara, Mexico was his hometown but he now lives in Los Angeles, California. He has said that as long as he is writing he will be in Los Angeles.

2. George Saunders was his mentor.
George Saunders was his teacher and mentor at Syracuse University where he received his MFA. Plascencia credits much of his unique character development to Saunders.
“He’s my teacher. I can’t say anything better than him. It’s the sophistication of not having a type of character but a really well-rounded, tough, shy, aggressive — everything that’s possible in a single character in a multi-dimensionality. That was the big George lesson. You don’t need to put up these characters that are archetypes. You need to break them down.”

3. Some readers thought he had included a code in his table of contents. He didn’t.
In People of Paper, the table of contents has various numbers of dots next to the chapter numbers. After publication many speculated that in true meta-fiction experimental fashion, it was a code. It was not. The dots signify the number of narrators in the chapter.

4. McSweeney’s published People of Paper in 2005 after rejections from most of the other major publishing houses.
Plascencia said that all the other major publishing houses rejected his book because they were afraid it wouldn’t sell. “What’s strange is that the companies that have the resources to take the risks don’t take them. Those who take them are some little independent like McSweeney’s. They take something on when they have very few resources.”

5. El Monte, one of the settings in People of Paper, was supposed to read like a love story to his hometown.
“Growing up, I loved my neighborhood, I loved my friends, I loved the community, and in a way I wanted to pay tribute to that, to El Monte. In a way it was always seen. It was on Cops a lot, it was a James Ellroy crime novel, but that wasn’t my El Monte.”

Bonus Fact: Check out the acknowledgements page at the end of People of Paper for a special thank you to someone important to the Roosevelt MFA Department.

Be sure to stop by Monday, September 29 at the Gage Gallery, 18 Michigan Avenue, refreshments being served at 4:30 pm, reading will begin at 5:00 pm.

These quotes came from a Bookslut Interview June 2006 by Angela Stubbs
http://www.bookslut.com/features/2006_06_009056.php

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About Oyez Review

Oyez Review is the literary magazine of Roosevelt University's MFA Program in Creative Writing. We publish high-quality fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and art from all over the nation and the world!
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